The Art of The Conversation With Motivated Sellers – Part 1

Posted on March 9, 2016 by

One of the concerns many of my students seem to run into is; once they find the deal, what do they say to the motivated sellers? How should that conversation go? On top of these concerns, many of my students say they are not really comfortable with having a conversation with a stranger, so how do they handle that conversation? How do you get over the “jitters”?

Okay, so you’ve practiced what you are going to say, you have a plan, you have your paperwork, you’ve probably procrastinated a little, then scheduled your appointment with the seller, so now what? You still feel those butterflies in your stomach and you’re still not comfortable with how the conversation with the seller is going to go. What should you say first? How should you make the offer? What if they ask you something you don’t know? What if they accept your offer? What if they don’t? Also remember that if you created your direct mail campaigns correctly in the first place you already have most of the information you need to have from the seller in order to create the deal.

Being “ready” or prepared is a relative term. Just because you don’t feel quite ready or totally comfortable dealing with this motivated seller face to face to make the deal doesn’t mean you shouldn’t just jump right in there and do it. You absolutely should!! Believe me, I understand this concept first hand after having had many conversations with motivated sellers. And it only gets easier every time you do it, especially when the seller is truly motivated.

I believe that there are definitely some things you can do to get prepared for a conversation with a motivated seller, especially if you haven’t done it before. With adequate preparation you can become more ready than not, and by being more ready, your chances of a successful conversation with your seller are greatly increased. Readiness is not just a practical matter; it is a state of mind that affects our emotions and feelings of preparedness. When you feel more ready to have a conversation with a motivated seller, you begin to relax, creating a more comfortable atmosphere and leaving you with fewer things to worry about.

Having conversations with motivated sellers is an art that can be practiced. With the right approach, it doesn’t have to be scary or unnerving. In fact the conversation with the sellers and the making of the deal should be fun, exciting, challenging and fulfilling, knowing that you are helping this motivated seller solve whatever problem they are having that necessitated them selling their property.

But sometimes it just seems like there are “demons” hiding out, just waiting to turn a normal, intelligent person into a quivering bowl of jello. When we get in front of the seller, we stutter, we mumble, we keep changing the subject, anything to steer away from the matter at hand. And worse still, we start to sweat, our hands begin to shake, and our memory of what we were going to say just fades away and we forget important facts we wanted to share.

Let me share a scenario where I had an appointment with a motivated seller. I drove around the block four times before turning into the seller’s drive-way, just to try to calm the jitters I was having. I ended up buying the property and later on the sellers mentioned to me that they had seen me going around the block several times. Fortunately we all had a good chuckle over it.

So how do we get past these jitters? And how do we get ready for these all important conversations with motivated sellers?

Be sure to read part two of this article next week when I share many ideas to get ready for these all important conversations with sellers and get your deals made!

Kathy KennebrookKathy Kennebrook is a speaker, author and has been actively investing in real estate since 1999, Kathy currently resides in Bradenton, FL and is known as the “Marketing Magic Lady” because she is the country’s leading real estate marketing expert on finding motivated sellers using direct mail.

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